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Standard STI test kit

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This at-home STI test kit for men detects 6 of the most common sexually transmitted infections, with results delivered to your inbox in a few days.

Check your sexual health status

We know it’s not always easy to talk about STIs, so we’ve made testing as easy and discreet as possible.

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This men’s STI kit is available to UK customers only.

£89.00

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Learn about the infections we test for

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Chlamydia is the most common STI in the UK and is caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.

How is chlamydia transmitted?

Chlamydia is spread through contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids. This can happen during:

  • Unprotected oral, vaginal, or anal sex
  • Close genital contact (even if there’s no penetration, orgasm, or ejaculation)
  • Sharing sex toys with an infected person

Whilst chlamydia can normally be treated with a short course of antibiotics, it can become serious if not treated early. Although rare, chlamydia can spread to the testicles and epididymis in men, causing pain and swelling. It has also been known to cause reactive arthritis in some men and women. In women, untreated chlamydia can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, ectoptic pregnancy and infertility.

Hepatitis B (HBV)

Hepatitis B (HBV) is a virus that affects the liver and can cause acute (i.e. less than 6 months) or chronic (i.e. more than 6 months) infection. How is HBV transmitted? HBV is very contagious and can be spread through sexual and non-sexual means. HBV is spread through the exchange of bodily fluids with an infected person. This can happen during:
  • Unprotected oral, vaginal, or anal sex
  • Biting or being bitten by an infected person
  • Sharing toothbrushes, razors, or needles
  • Sharing sex toys with an infected person

HIV

HIV is an STI that attacks the immune system and weakens your ability to fight off everyday infections. How is HIV transmitted? HIV can be spread through sexual and non-sexual means. HIV is spread through the exchange of bodily fluids with an infected person. This can happen during:
  • Unprotected oral, vaginal, or anal sex
  • Close genital contact (even if there’s no penetration, orgasm, or ejaculation)
  • Biting or being bitten by an infected person
  • Sharing toothbrushes, razors, or needles
  • Sharing sex toys with an infected person

Syphilis

Syphilis is an STI caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. There are 4 stages of syphilis: primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary. Without treatment, syphilis can progress through all 4 stages. How is syphilis transmitted? Syphilis is spread primarily through contact with an infected lesion or sore. This can happen during:
  • Unprotected oral, vaginal, or anal sex
  • Close genital contact (even if there’s no penetration, orgasm, or ejaculation)
  • Sharing sex toys with an infected person

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is the most common STI in the UK and is caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. How is chlamydia transmitted? Chlamydia is spread through contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids. This can happen during:
  • Unprotected oral, vaginal, or anal sex
  • Close genital contact (even if there’s no penetration, orgasm, or ejaculation)
  • Sharing sex toys with an infected person

Gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea is the second most common STI in the UK and is caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae. How is gonorrhoea transmitted? Gonorrhoea is spread through contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids. This can happen during:
  • Unprotected oral, vaginal, or anal sex
  • Close genital contact (even if there’s no penetration, orgasm, or ejaculation)
  • Sharing sex toys with an infected person

Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis is an STI which is often present alongside other STIs and is caused by the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. How is trichomoniasis transmitted? Trichomoniasis is spread through contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids. This can happen during:
  • Unprotected oral, vaginal, or anal sex
  • Close genital contact (even if there’s no penetration, orgasm, or ejaculation)
  • Sharing sex toys with an infected person

How it works

Order your Test Kit

Select your men's kit by Yoxly, place an order and receive in the post in discreet packaging.

Collect and Send Back your Sample

Take your sample in your own time and, on the same day, post it back in the pre-paid envelope.

Quick and Accurate Processing

Your test is analyzed in accredited labs and further reviewed by a licensed medical professional.

See your Results

We’ll notify by email when your results are ready. View them in the secure My Yoxly portal.

Understanding the symptoms

Most people with chlamydia–up to 70% of women, and 50% of men–have no symptoms, even though they can still pass the infection on to others. Those who develop symptoms usually do so within 1 – 3 weeks after exposure, though chlamydia symptoms can occur at any time, from days to months after infection. Symptoms of chlamydia can include:
  • Pain in your lower abdomen
  • Unusual vaginal bleeding (e.g. after sex, between periods)
  • Unusual discharge from your vagina (e.g. more than usual) or penis (e.g. white, watery)
  • Painful or swollen testicles
  • Pain or burning when you pee
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Pain or discharge from your back passage (if you have a rectal chlamydia)
  • Pain in your throat (if you have pharyngeal chlamydia, though usually this is asymptomatic)
  • Pain or redness in your eye (if you have conjunctival chlamydia)
Many people with gonorrhea–up to 50% of women and 10% of men–have no symptoms, even though they can still pass the infection on to others. Those who develop symptoms usually do so within the first 2 weeks after exposure (women usually develop symptoms in 2-10 days, and men in 2-5 days), though gonorrhea symptoms can occur at any time, from days to months after infection. Symptoms of gonorrhea can include:
  • Pain in your lower abdomen
  • Unusual vaginal bleeding (e.g. during sex, between periods, heavier periods)
  • Unusual discharge from your vagina (e.g. more than usual, and which could be green or yellow) or penis (e.g. which could be white, yellow, or green)
  • Painful or swollen testicles
  • Pain or difficulty when you pee
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Itching or discharge (e.g. blood or mucus) from your back passage (if you have rectal gonorrhea)
  • Pain in your throat (if you have pharyngeal gonorrhea, which is usually asymptomatic)
  • Pain or redness in your eye (if you have conjunctival gonorrhea)
Many people with trichomoniasis–up to 50% of women and 50% of men–have no symptoms, even though they can still pass the infection on to others. Those who develop symptoms usually do so within the first 4 weeks after exposure, though trichomoniasis symptoms can occur at any time, from days to months after infection. Symptoms of trichomoniasis can include:
  • Pain in your lower abdomen
  • Pain, itching, and/or redness around the vagina
  • Unusual discharge from your vagina (e.g. often frothy and yellow, though it may be green, thin or thick, sometimes with an unpleasant smell) or penis (e.g. often thin and white)
  • Pain, swelling, and/or redness around of the tip of your penis (glans)
  • Pain when you pee, or peeing more often than usual
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Pain when you ejaculate
Many people with HBV have no symptoms and may not know they are infected, though they can still pass the infection on to others. HBV symptoms can occur at any time, from weeks to years after infection. In the early stage of HBV infection, not all individuals develop symptoms. Those who do develop symptoms often experience a flu-like illness, including vomiting and diarrhoea, abdominal pain, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin/eyes) about 2-3 months after exposure. approximately 90% of adults are able to clear the HBV infection and have no ongoing health problems after about 3-6 months. During the acute stage of the HBV infection (i.e. the first 6 months), people are infectious and can spread the disease to others, whether or not they have symptoms. After the first 6 months, those who clear the acute HBV infection are usually immune for life. However, approximately 10% of people with HBV go on to develop it chronically. People with chronic HBV are still infectious. Chronic HBV can cause severe liver damage (e.g. cirrhosis, liver failure, liver cancer).
Some people with HIV have no symptoms and may not know they are infected, even though they can still pass the infection to others. In the early stages of HIV infection, not all individuals develop symptoms. Those who do often present with a flu-like illness about 2 to 6 weeks after infection. After this time, HIV symptoms may not re-present until months or years later, although the virus is still actively destroying the immune system. Symptoms of HIV can include:
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Diarrhea
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Recurrent infections
  • Night sweats
  • Skin rashes
Some people with syphilis have no symptoms, though they can still pass the infection on to others. Syphilis symptoms can occur at any time, from days to years after infection. The symptoms of syphilis depend on the stage, though all 4 stages of syphilis can be infectious. Primary syphilis: the first symptoms often develop 2-3 weeks after initial infection.
  • Small, painless ulcer at the site of infection (penis, vagina, anal area, mouth, lips, fingers), which may go unnoticed
  • Swollen glands in the neck, armpits, or groin
Secondary syphilis: these symptoms develop within 6 months of infection, and can come and go for several months before disappearing.
  • Blotchy red rash that can appear anywhere on the body, but is most often on the palms of the hands or the soles of the feet; these symptoms may disappear while the infection continues
  • Small skin growths (like warts) on the vulva or around the anus
  • White patches in the mouth
  • Swollen glands in the neck, armpits, or groin
  • Flu-like symptoms (i.e. fatigue, headaches, joint pains, fever)
  • Patchy hair loss
Latent (hidden) syphilis: this period can be from 1 to 20 years after infection. During this time the person may have no symptoms, or they may have relapses of secondary syphilis symptoms Tertiary (late) syphilis: this period can be anywhere from 1 to 45 years after infection, and can cause a variety of symptoms.
  • Skin and bone lesions
  • Cardiovascular problems, such as heart failure, heart murmurs, angina, aneurysms, or strokes
  • Neurological problems, such as dementia, psychosis, lightning pains, numbness, loss of coordination, vision problems, or blindness

Most people with chlamydia — up to 50% of men and up to  70% of women — have no symptoms, even though they can still pass the infection on to others. Those who develop symptoms usually do so within 1 – 3 weeks after exposure, though chlamydia symptoms can occur from a few days to months after infection. Symptoms of chlamydia can include:

  • Painful or swollen testicles
  • Pain or burning when you pee
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Pain or discharge from your back passage (if you have a rectal chlamydia)
  • Pain in your throat (if you have pharyngeal chlamydia, though usually this is asymptomatic)
  • Pain or redness in your eye (if you have conjunctival chlamydia)
  • Unusual vaginal bleeding (e.g. after sex, between periods)
  • Unusual discharge from your vagina (e.g. more than usual) or penis (e.g. white, watery)

Collect your blood and urine samples in a time and place of your choosing, following the detailed instruction leaflet that’s included in your kit. Check out this video from Yoxly on collecting your urine sample below.

When to test

Don’t delay getting tested if you think you have chlamydia (i.e. you or your partner(s) have any of the above symptoms, a partner tells you they have an STI, or you had unprotected sex with someone new, etc). You can get tested for chlamydia at any time, though you may be advised to repeat the test 2 weeks after the date of any potential exposure, as chlamydia can take up to 2 weeks from the time of exposure to show up positive in tests. Therefore unless you have symptoms, we recommend that you wait 2 weeks from the time of exposure to test for chlamydia.

Importantly, if you are pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant, and are concerned you may have chlamydia, we recommend seeking immediate attention and/or advice from a medical professional.

If you think you have gonorrhea (e.g. you or your partner(s) have any of the above symptoms, your partner tells you they have an STI, or you had unprotected sex with someone new, etc), you should take a test. Similar to with Chlamydia, you can get tested for gonorrhoea at any time, and should do as soon as possible if you have symptoms or have other risk factors. However if you have no symptoms, we recommend that you wait 2 weeks from the time of exposure to test for gonorrhoea since it can take up to 2 weeks to show up positive in tests.

If you or your partner are pregnant or suspect to be pregnant, and are concerned you may have gonorrhoea, you should seek immediate attention and/or advice from a medical professional.

Just like with chlamydia and gonorrhea, don’t delay in getting tested if you think you may have trichomoniasis. You can get tested for trichomoniasis at any time, although you may need to repeat the test 2 weeks after the date of potential exposure for a positive test to show up. Unless you have symptoms, we recommend that you wait 2 weeks from the time of exposure to test for trichomoniasis.

Trichomoniasis is often present alongside other STIs. If you test positive for trichomoniasis, we recommend that you and your recent sexual partner(s) are also tested for a range of other STIs, including chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, HIV, and hepatitis B.

Importantly, if you or your partner are pregnant or suspect to be pregnant, and are concerned you may have trichomoniasis, you should seek immediate attention and/or advice from a medical professional.

If you think you have Hepatitis B (HBV) (i.e. you or your partner have any of the above symptoms, your partner told you they have an STI, you had unprotected sex with a new partner, etc), you should get checked. We recommend that you wait 4 weeks from the time of exposure to test for HBV, as this is when tests typically show for the infection. Repeat the test at 12 weeks, as it can take up to this length of time for the virus to show up in tests, although you don’t need to wait that long to seek support.

Importantly, if you or your partner are pregnant or suspect to be pregnant, and are concerned you may have HIV, you should seek immediate attention and/or advice from a medical professional.

If you think you have HIV, don’t hesitate to take a STI test. You can get tested for HIV at any time, though HIV tests are most accurate 4 weeks after potential exposure. Similar to HBV, you may be advised to repeat the test 12 weeks after the date of potential exposure as it can take this length of time to show up positive in tests.

Importantly, if you or your partner are pregnant or suspect to be pregnant, and are concerned you may have HIV, you should seek immediate attention and/or advice from a medical professional.

Early diagnosis and treatment of HIV can help prevent progression to AIDS and reduce the risk of transmitting the virus to others, using antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat it. AIDS is defined as the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by severe damage to the immune system and the development of life-threatening infections and cancers.

If you have symptoms of syphilis, you should get tested as soon as possible. It can take up to 12 weeks after the date of potential exposure for tests to register in tests, so if you do not have symptoms, or if your result initially came back negative, we recommend that you do a test 12 weeks from the time of exposure.

It’s important to note that not everyone with syphilis will progress through all four stages of the disease, as it can be treated and cured in its early stages with antibiotics.

If you or your partner are pregnant or suspect you may be pregnant, and are concerned you may have syphilis or may have been exposed to it, you should seek immediate attention and/or advice from a medical professional.

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Wearing tight pants and underwear

Studies show that men who wear looser underwear have higher sperm concentration and total sperm count compared to men who wear tighter underwear. So, lose the tight clothes and wear something loose to give your testicles some air.

CONCLUSION: learn more about how heat can affect sperm quality here.

Stress

Besides higher mortality rate and various diseases, stress is associated with low sperm quality. Stress is known to be associated with lower testosterone levels and oxidative stress with both playing an essential role in producing and maintaining healthy sperm cells.

CONCLUSION: If you feel stressed, we recommend you get some help so you can have a balanced mental health. For a stress management guide, download the ExSeed app for free and start your personalized action plan today.

Physical activity

Scientific studies show that men who are physically active have better semen parameters than men who are inactive. Fertility specialists also state that regular physical activity has beneficial impact on sperm fertility parameters and such a lifestyle can enhance the fertility status of men.

Prioritizing exercise can help improve your overall health and result in healthy, fast swimming sperm cells that have good chances of fertilizing an egg.

CONCLUSION: Try incorporating exercise in your weekly schedule to you ensure exercising at least twice weekly. We recommend a combination of cardio training and strength exercise. Read more about exercise and male fertility on our blog.

Nutrition

Fast Food
Processed foods damage the health of sperm-producing cells and cause oxidative stress, which lead to poorer sperm quality. Heavy consumption of junk food (every week) can increase the likelihood of infertility since men who consume vast amounts of unhealthy food are at risk of having poor sperm quality. Besides harming your fertility, junk food enlarges your waistline, harms your cardiovascular system, kidneys, and more.

Vegetables
Eating more fruit and vegetables can increase your sperm concentration and motility. It’s important that you consume a healthy diet filled with antioxidants and that you eat vegetables every day. Foods such as apricots and red bell peppers are high in vitamin A, which improves male fertility by nurturing healthier sperm. Men who are deficient in this vitamin tend to have slow and sluggish sperm.

Sugary snacks/beverages: several times a week Excessive consumption of high sugar items can lead to oxidative stress, which negatively impacts testosterone levels and sperm motility. Sugary snacks and beverages are also highly associated with obesity and low fertility.
CONCLUSION: To boost sperm quality, stay away from fast food, processed food, and sugary snacks or beverages. You need to implement a healthy prudent diet filled with necessary superfoods needed for good sperm production. Check out our guide to Male Fertility Superfoods. For personalized guidance and support on how you can start improving your sperm health, check out the Bootcamp.

Heat

Direct heat can inhibit optimal sperm production and cause Sperm DNA damage. Sperm cells like environments that are a couple of degrees lower than body temperature. Avoid overheating from warm blankets, seat warmers, heat from your laptop, hot showers, and saunas.

Cigarette smoking

The exposure to tobacco smoke has significant negative effects on semen quality. The damage of cigarettes and nicotine of course depends on how many cigarettes you smoke per day and for how long, but even low usage (up to 10 cigarettes / day) can inhibit healthy sperm production.  

CONCLUSION: Stay as far away from cigarette smoking as possible if you care about your general health and your fertility. Read more here.

Cell phone

When you have your cell phone in your front pocket, your testicles are exposed to electromagnetic radiation, which studies have shown to damage the sperm cells. Put your phone in the back pocket of your pants or in your jacket pocket.

BMI

There is a clear association between obesity and reduced sperm quality. At least part of the reason for this is that obese men may have abnormal reproductive hormonal profiles, which can impair sperm production and lead to infertility. 

A BMI higher than 30 can lead to several processes in the body (overheating, increase in oxidative stress in the testes, sperm DNA damage, erectile dysfunction) that can have a negative impact on male fertility. This can result in problems when trying to conceive.  

CONCLUSION: BMI is one of the risk factors that influence semen quality and, for example, sperm motility.  

Alcohol

A beer or glass of wine now and then do not really harm sperm quality. But excess alcohol drinking (more than 20 units per week) can reduce the production of normally formed sperm needed for a successful pregnancy.

CONCLUSION: If you want to stay safe, stay under 14 units of alcohol per week. For more information on how alcohol can affect male fertility, take a look at our blog: “Alcohol and Sperm Quality”.

Age

Studies show that women younger than 35 and men younger than 40 have a better chance of getting pregnant. Men can produce sperm cells almost through their entire life, but the sperm cell DNA is more fragile and prone to damage after the age of 40.

As men age, their testes tend to get smaller and softer resulting in a decline in sperm quality and production. These changes are partly because of an age-related decrease in testosterone level, which plays a very important role in sperm

production. Higher male age (>40 years) is not only associated with a decline in sperm production but also with increased sperm DNA fragmentation and worsened morphology (shape) and motility (movement). These negative effects make the sperm cells less qualified for egg fertilization.

CONCLUSION: with an age under 40, you shouldn’t have to worry much about age as a factor in itself. However, studies have shown a slow decline after the age of 30-35 years

and if you are above 40 years of age, your sperm quality can be affected due to increased sperm DNA damage resulting in a decrease of sperm motility and concentration. Remember that you cannot evaluate the quality of a sperm sample by just looking at it – this requires a sperm analysis.